Welcome, readers! I hope you find something useful in the stories I write. Share them if it helps. Thanks for visiting.

Now Available: Cocoon Kids

Cocoon Kids - Short Stories by Joseph GrammerBuy now »
Amazon Kindle Joseph Grammer fiction writer

Cocoon Kids scared me when I patched it together. I was working on a novel—still unpublished—and thought I had no room for short stories in my anxious, idle day. Thirty or forty tales in various stages of completion lurked around my hard drive, clinging to the back of my mind and asking when they’d get to see the light of day. Bullies.

“After the novel, after the novel,” I said. But sometimes in the middle of the night I’d edit a story I particularly liked, or hated, and feel a weird surge of joy. Maybe the tired novel would grow envious and hurry towards completion. Wishful thinking, of course, but I did manage to clean some stories up.

So what is it? An effort to find love and safety in a world that can feel empty of both aspects. Some characters gain an understanding of how their perceptions of the world influences this, and they change, while others cannot crack the shell of their own isolation. The necessity of others to progress in life is a theme that runs through the story cycle, and it is this theme that each character must reconcile in her own way. Plus, there’s humor (at least my strange variation of it).

I can only hope that readers who struggle for love and safety will find some small enjoyment in these pages, and that they will forgive any errors or offenses. Authors like Carver, O’Connor, Barnes, Kawabata, and Tanizaki pushed me to give the short story its due, and I tried to dip a crooked toe into their shoes. There’s still a lot of room to grow, so I’ll count this as the first pencil-notch in the doorway. I know I’m much shorter than I think I am—but I’m pretty sure everybody falls prey to that.

Thank you for your time, patience, and open brains.
Joe Grammer, October 2013


If you like the snippets of things you’ve read here, you can buy Cocoon Kids on Amazon.com.

Explore the Stories

  • Cocoon-Kids-Story-Icons-v1-riastrad Riastrad

    Pain makes poor choices.

  • Cocoon-Kids-Story-Icons-v1-wake-up Wake Up

    Fight your role models.

  • Cocoon-Kids-Story-Icons-v1-the-feeble-poet The Feeble Poet

    Finding yourself is overrated.

  • Cocoon-Kids-Story-Icons-v1-the-christian-surgeon The Perfect Surgeon

    Be careful what you use your skills for.

  • Cocoon-Kids-Story-Icons-v1-pancakes Pancakes

    Life can pivot on small things.

  • Cocoon-Kids-Story-Icons-v1-kettle-hours Kettle Hours

    Peace is a skill.

  • Cocoon-Kids-Story-Icons-v1-jerry Jerry

    Isolation rocks.

  • Cocoon-Kids-Story-Icons-v1-high-wire High-Wire

    Magic and sexism shouldn’t mix.

  • Cocoon-Kids-Story-Icons-v1-grandpa-farron Grandpa Farron

    Cranky goblins need love, too.

  • Cocoon-Kids-Story-Icons-v1-glory-days Glory Days

    Men have strong drives.

  • Cocoon-Kids-Story-Icons-v1-comfort Comfort

    Find connections where you can.

  • Cocoon-Kids-Story-Icons-v1-a-squid-for-mr-calaway A Squid for Mr. Calaway

    Love is weird and alien.

  • Cocoon-Kids-Story-Icons-v1-a-candle-burned Burned

    Harm and help have little to do with intentions.


Buy these stories on Amazon.com


Sign up to receive updates about new work from Joe Grammer

Friends, family, readers—it sucks to ask for help, but I’m doing it. Thank you in advance for any step you take. Just visiting the site and reading this is great, although I urge you to consider the following:
  1. Share my website or Amazon.com page with people you think would enjoy what I write.
  2. Follow me on Twitter and start a conversation.
  3. Provide contact with publishers you personally know.
  4. Let me know if something is broken on this website.

Coming Soon: The Lost Kamikaze

On a trip to Okinawa, isolated, stubborn researcher Tom Leford battles suicidal thoughts and demonic possession while studying a rash of Air Force suicides. A book-crazy thug, a peaceful sergeant, and a journalist with revolutionary plans draw Tom into an island known for World War II’s bloodiest conflict, as well as Earth’s happiest people. The demon spurs him to understand the roots of recovery, and to imagine Okinawa’s future with America and Japan. Tom wants nothing more than to avoid problems, to flee change and awareness, but his reluctant journey for understanding leads him deeper into a conflicted history—and ultimately to Tokyo, where he probes the bottom of his own past.

Read a bit of the book here »